photography

March

This weeks collection has a more urban feel. There’s a few beach photos in there, but most of the shots were taken in railways stations, Bournemouth and Westbourne. With one in Southampton. I had an afternoon in the port city to go pick up a new work phone. The photos might give the impression the area is deserted. That is far from the case, and things are getting busier. Next month we may get a bit of sun. The town will then be overrun by grockles.

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photography

February

The second month of my latest 365 project is done. This also brings winter to a close, by my preferred system of seasons. I like each season to fit into neat blocks of three full months. Spring begins tomorrow as far as I’m concerned.

You’ll possibly notice three recurring themes in the photos below. This will likely continue throughout the year. Bournemouth town. Railways. The beach. But there’s a few token shots dedicated to diversity in there. The interior car shot might look bland at first glance. But it records a major milestone, if you look carefully. I had been on target to hit 10,000 miles in about August 2020. Then the pandemic struck and my monthly mileage plummeted.

There’s a dull shot of the sofa at home. This is the sort of photo that pads out many a 365 project. Its 11 pm and you suddenly remember that you haven’t taken a photo for the day yet. But, as with all the other photos, it has value as a visual record of my life in 2021.

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photography

January

The photos are in order, from top to bottom, left to right. Starting with the featured photo of some iced berries on January 1st. One photo for each day of the month. Most of them are self explanatory. The bowl of berries, maybe not. Mrs P and I went picking sloe berries back in October and I turned a bottle of ordinary gin into my own brand of sloe gin.

At the beginning of January, I filtered the gin back into its bottle. Thanks to the addition of the juice from the sloes and sugar, I had enough to half fill another bottle. I didn’t waste the gin soaked berries that remained though. I removed the seeds and boiled them up with some Bramley apples and sugar and made a big pot of jam.

We haven’t tasted either, yet. The sloe gin is best left to rest for a few weeks. Perhaps Mrs P will sample it some time this month. I’m not much of a fan of alcohol. I’ll stick to the jam. Removing the seeds from sloes is essential when jam making, but incredibly laborious. It needs to taste real good for me to ever bother going to that effort again.

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